Personal Taxation

Personal tax cuts brought forward to 1 July 2020

In the Budget, the Government announced that it will bring forward to 1 July 2020 the personal tax cuts (Stage 2) that were previously legislated in 2018 to commence from 1 July 2022. The Stage 3 tax changes remain unchanged and commence from 1 July 2024, as previously legislated:

  • Stage 2 tax rates – was 1 July 2022, now 1 July 2020; and
  • Stage 3 tax rates – unchanged; to commence on 1 July 2024, as previously legislated.

The Government will bring forward the Stage 2 personal income tax cuts to 1 July 2020 (from 1 July 2022, as previously legislated in 2018). The Treasurer said this will see more than 11 million taxpayers get an immediate tax cut backdated to 1 July 2020.

From 1 July 2020:

  • the top threshold of the 19% personal income tax bracket will increase from $37,000 to $45,000; and
  • the top threshold of the 32.5% tax bracket will increase from $90,000 to $120,000.

The new low income tax offset (maximum $700) has also been brought forward to 2020–2021, while the low and middle income tax offset (maximum $1,080) has been retained for 2020–2021.

Mr Frydenberg said more than seven million individuals are expected to receive tax relief of $2,000 or more for the 2020–2021 income year compared with the 2017–2018 tax settings. Low and middle income tax payers will receive relief of up to $2,745 for singles and $5,490 for dual income families.

Stage 3: from 2024–2025

The Stage 3 tax changes remain unchanged and commence from 1 July 2024, as previously legislated. From 1 July 2024, the 32.5% marginal tax rate will be cut to 30% for one big tax bracket between $45,000 and $200,000. This will more closely align the middle tax bracket of the personal income tax system with corporate tax rates. The 37% tax bracket will be entirely abolished at this time under the Government’s already legislated plan.

Therefore, from 1 July 2024, there will only be three personal income tax rates: 19%, 30% and 45%. From 1 July 2024, taxpayers earning between $45,000 and $200,000 will face a marginal tax rate of 30%. 

With these changes, around 94% of Australian taxpayers are projected to face a marginal tax rate of 30% or less.

Low income offsets: new LITO brought forward and LMITO retained

The Government announced in the Budget that the new low income tax offset (LITO) will be brought forward to start as from the 2020–2021 income year. The new LITO was intended to replace the existing low income and low and middle income tax offsets as from 2022–2023. Although the existing LITO is scrapped, the low and middle income offset (LMITO) will be retained for 2020–2021.

Bringing forward the new LITO is a consequence of bringing forward to 2020–2021 the tax cuts that were scheduled to start in 2022–2023.

The maximum amount of the new LITO is $700. The LITO will be withdrawn at a rate of 5 cents per dollar between taxable incomes of $37,500 and $45,000 and then at a rate of 1.5 cents per dollar between taxable incomes of $45,000 and $66,667.

The amount of the LMITO is $255 for taxpayers with a taxable income of $37,000 or less. Between $37,000 and $48,000, the value of LMITO increases at a rate of 7.5 cents per dollar to the maximum amount of $1,080. Taxpayers with taxable incomes from $48,000 to $90,000 are eligible for the maximum LMITO of $1,080. From $90,001 to $126,000, LMITO phases out at a rate of 3 cents per dollar.

CGT exemption for “granny flats”

The Budget confirms that the Government will put in place a “targeted” CGT exemption for granny flat arrangements.

Under the measure, CGT will not apply to the creation, variation or termination of a granny flat arrangement providing accommodation where there is a formal written agreement in place. The Budget states that it will apply to arrangements that provide accommodation for “older Australians or those with a disability”. There are no further details as to what constitutes “older” or “disability”.

The exemption will only apply to agreements that are entered into because of “family relationships or other personal ties” and will not apply to commercial rental arrangements.

It is intended that the measure commence from 1 July 2021 (ie next financial year), subject to the passage of necessary legislation.

The measure was earlier announced by the Treasurer and Assistant Treasurer on 5 October 2020, the day the Government also publicly released the Board of Taxation’s report on the taxation of granny flat arrangements (the report had been provided to the Government in November 2019). That report recommended the CGT exemption.

First Home Loan Deposit Scheme: additional 10,000 places

The Government will allocate an additional 10,000 places for first home buyers under the existing First Home Loan Deposit Scheme.

Under the existing Scheme, eligible first home buyers can obtain a loan to build a new home or purchase a newly built home with a deposit of as little as 5%. The Scheme provides a Government-backed guarantee equals to the difference between the deposit (of at least 5%) and 20% of the purchase price. Applications can be made as part of the standard home loan application process through participating lenders. The Scheme has already helped almost 20,000 first home buyers.

The Treasurer said eligible first home buyers will also be able to take advantage of the Federal Government’s First Home Super Saver Scheme and HomeBuilder. First home buyers may also be eligible for State and Territory grants and concessions.

The additional 10,000 places under the scheme will be provided from 6 October 2020. The additional guarantees will be available until 30 June 2021.

Business Taxation

Small business tax concessions extended to medium businesses

The Budget confirmed the Government’s announcement on 2 October 2020 that a range of tax concessions currently available to small businesses (aggregated annual turnover under $10 million) will be made available to medium sized businesses (aggregated annual turnover of $10 million or more but less than $50 million). The extension of these concessions to medium businesses will be delivered in three phases:

  • From 1 July 2020, eligible businesses will be able to immediately deduct certain start-up expenses and certain prepaid expenditure.
  • From 1 April 2021, eligible businesses will be exempt from the 47% FBT on car parking and multiple work-related portable electronic devices, such as phones or laptops, provided to employees (note that an FBT exemption for retraining redeployed employees will also apply from 2 October 2020).
  • From 1 July 2021:
  • eligible businesses will be able to access the simplified trading stock rules, remit PAYG instalments based on GDP adjusted notional tax, and settle excise duty and excise-equivalent customs duty monthly on eligible goods;
  • The time limit for the ATO to amend income tax assessments will be reduced from four to two years for eligible business for income years starting from 1 July 2021; and
  • the ATO power to create a simplified accounting method determination for GST purposes will be expanded to apply to businesses below the $50 million aggregated annual turnover threshold.

The eligibility turnover thresholds for other small business tax concessions will remain at their current levels.

Outright capital assets deduction until 30 June 2022 for most businesses

Businesses with aggregated annual turnover of less than $5 billion will be enable to deduct the full cost of eligible capital assets acquired from 7:30pm AEDT on 6 October 2020 (Budget night) and first used or installed by 30 June 2022.

Full expensing in the year of first use will apply to new depreciable assets and the cost of improvements to existing eligible assets. For small and medium sized businesses (with aggregated annual turnover of less than $50 million), full expensing will also apply to second-hand assets.

Businesses with aggregated annual turnover between $50 million and $500 million can still deduct the full cost of eligible second-hand assets costing less than $150,000 that are purchased by 31 December 2020 under the current instant asset write-off rules. Businesses that hold assets eligible for the $150,000 instant asset write-off will have an extra six months (until 30 June 2021), to first use or install such assets.

Small businesses (with aggregated annual turnover of less than $10 million) can deduct the balance of their simplified depreciation pool at the end of the income year while full expensing applies. The provisions which prevent small businesses from re-entering the simplified depreciation regime for five years if they opt-out will continue to be suspended.

Loss carry-back from 2019–2020, 2020–2021 and 2021–2022

The Government will allow eligible companies to carry back tax losses from the 2019–2020, 2020–2021 or 2021–2022 income years to offset previously taxed profits in 2018–2019 or later income years.

Corporate tax entities with an aggregated turnover of less than $5 billion will be able to apply tax losses against taxed profits in a previous year, generating a refundable tax offset in the year in which the loss is made.

The tax refund will be limited by requiring that the amount carried back to not exceed the earlier taxed profits and to not generate a franking account deficit. The tax refund will be available on election by eligible businesses when they lodge their 2020–2021 and 2021–2022 tax returns.

Companies that do not elect to carry back losses under this measure can carry losses forward as normal.

Instant asset write-off: minor change

Given the largesse of the new outright deduction for capital assets until 30 June 2022, the instant asset write-off rules have become temporarily irrelevant for most taxpayers (those with aggregated annual turnover of less than $5 billion).

Accordingly, there were no changes to the rules, other than a slight tweaking for costs relating to second-hand goods acquired by large businesses (with annual aggregated turnover between $50 million and $500 million).

The new outright deduction rules do not apply to second-hand goods, other than those acquired by small and medium businesses (with aggregated annual turnover of less than $50 million) – who can fully expense costs associated with second-hand goods.

For this reason, businesses with aggregated annual turnover between $50 million and $500 million can still deduct the full cost of eligible second-hand assets costing less than $150,000 that are purchased by 31 December 2020 under the instant asset write-off provisions. The tweak is this: businesses that hold assets eligible for the $150,000 instant asset write-off will have an extra six months, until 30 June 2021, to first use or install those assets.

The following information sets out the rates and thresholds as they currently operate – but should be read in the context that the instant asset write-off rules are effectively irrelevant for most eligible assets purchased after 6 October 2020 until 30 June 2022. The rules set out three taxpayer categories.

Small business entities

Those taxpayers with aggregated turnover of less than $10 million and who satisfy the other tests in Subdiv 328-C of ITAA 1997 can qualify as small business entities for the purpose of the instant asset write-off rules. A depreciating asset is a low cost asset if its cost as at the end of the income year in which the taxpayer starts t